Man Sticks Fingers Inside Crocodile’s Eyes To Free Himself During Attack

The man apparently managed to release himself by inserting his fingers into the crocodile’s eyes, allowing him to swim to the shore.

Man Sticks Fingers Inside Crocodile's Eyes To Free Himself During Attack

The man was attacked by a 4.5-meter reptile that tried to drown him.

A man was mauled by a crocodile on a beach in far north Queensland, Australia. While spearfishing near Cooktown, the 44-year-old man was attacked by a 4.5-meter reptile that tried to drown him. He was able to defend himself by sticking his fingers in its eyes, as per a report in News.com.au

The assault took place at Archer Point in Cooktown just before 1 pm on Saturday. Valerie Noble, a paramedic with the Queensland Ambulance Service, spoke to Seven News and said, “He has been in the water when he has noticed an approximately four-and-a-half-metre crocodile swimming towards him which he has tried to fend off with his spear gun, unsuccessfully. 

He further added, “It has bitten him three times and dragged him to the bottom.”

The man apparently managed to release himself by inserting his fingers into the crocodile’s eyes, allowing him to swim to the shore. The man was hurt in the head, leg, and shoulder. He was flown to the base hospital in Cairns, where he is now in a critical but stable condition.

Wildlife officers will look into the occurrence, according to a representative for the Queensland Department of Environment and Science, as reported by News.com.au. They added that the staff members will also go to check if the crocodile is still in the vicinity.

“The information provided to DES suggests the man reportedly suffered serious injuries. Archer Point is known croc country. Remember, you are responsible for your own safety in croc country,” the spokesperson added.

The incident occurred only a few days after a 65-year-old man was bitten on April 4 while napping at Newell Beach close to Port Douglas. He sustained a minor leg injury. 

The Queensland government declared it to be a “timely reminder” for people to be “crocwise” after the event.

The outlet noted that there were eight reported crocodile attacks between 2020 and March 2023, citing the data from the Queensland Department of Environment and Science, seven of which were non-fatal. 

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